Horta Museum

Formerly the private house and studio of the architect Victor Horta, this museum commemorates his life and work - ofering the opportunity to see how one of the leading lights in Art Nouveau lived and worked.

The Horta Museum, built between 1898 and 1901, was owned and designed by the best-known Art Nouveau architect, Victor Horta.

An Art Nouveau masterpiece

The house’s decoration and structure combine beautifully with wrought iron beams that merge with glazed tiles, mirrors, windows, marble and wood.

While you explore the music room, the bedroom, the dining room or the guest room, you can observe the little details that Horta thought of to make the whole building work as a whole. All the rooms are connected to a central staircase that leads to glass roof that lets an almost magical light into the house.

The architect

Victor Horta is considered a key Art Nouveau architect and is one of the movement’s founders, a style that is famous for integrating architecture with interior decoration, making homes into a work of art.

Horta is also responsible for designing some of the city’s most beautiful buildings, like the Centre for Fine Arts (Palais des beaux-arts de Bruxelles), the Belgian Comic Strip Center or the Musical Instrument Museums.

If you have enough time

The Horta Museum is a magnificent example of an Art Nouveau building. In our opinion, the museum is definitely worthwhile visiting if you are a fan of Victor Horta or of architecture and decoration in general. However, since it is located in a residential neighbourhood a little far from the city centre, it might be a good idea to visit it only if you are in Brussels for over a weekend.

Schedule

Tuesday to Sunday: 2 pm – 5:30 pm
Closed: Monday, 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May, Ascension Day, 21 July, 15 August, 1 November, 11 November and 25 December.

Price

Adults: €10
Students and seniors (aged over 65): €5
Children (aged between 6 and 18): €3

Transport

Tram: Place Janson, lines 81, 91, 92 and 97.
Bus: Place Janson, line 54.